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Popular wristwatch: Smartwatch gives you benefits

Smartwatch recently becomes popular nowadays. Not only to show the current time but Smartwatch also gives you a lot of benefits at once. Scrolled down to find more about Smartwatch.

Maybe some of you are unfamiliar with this device, even this device called Smartwatch is popular nowadays. As part of the internet of things, the smartwatch is bravely standing along with any other smart devices, like the smartphone in your hand. For you who not familiar with this device, let’s find out together about Smartwatch and its benefits for you.

What you need to know about Smartwatch

Smartwatch, a portable device which forms like a wirtswatch could give you a of benefits only on thtough your wirst. Photo take from HeatlhTech

Smartwatch is a portable device which is designed like a wristwatch and could be worn on a wrist. The popular smartwatch uses a touchscreen for the user to operate the device and it could offer several apps carried from the device itself. The existence of this device is to encourage people to use a mini portable computer on their wrists.

Most of the smartwatch becomes a wireless Bluetooth adaptor to connect with user smartphone. That is why through the smartwatch, we could have control over the smartphone without taking our phone out of pocket. Consequently, it gives you some benefits for efficiency with Smartwatch is on the wrist.

Benefits of using the Smartwatch

Because of the Smartwatch capabilities to connect with your smartphone, you could receive calls and replay message instantly with only to a glance to your wrists. You even can get notifications from social media immediately. Some smartwatch also provides voice support so it will be more efficient to give command through your voice instead.

In addition, Smartwatch also could facilitate you with a fitness tracker and healthcare. As examples, this device could help to analyze your heartbeats or monitor patients for a chronic condition. In the HealthTech website, they tell that smartwatches give helps to collect heart health data. Some hospitals even launched the system program to better track their patients especially patients with chronic diseases.

Furthermore, with fancy and elegant design from the Smartwatch, it could support your sense of fashion. There are more smartwatches out there that have a stylish design suit with your style and it could make you look more fashionable.

There is a lot of type and design for the smartwatch that will give you benefits depending on your needs. Photo taken watchranker.com

In the end, the smartwatch is not about telling time alone. It does help its users as fitness track, or maybe as health monitoring, or for daily life used as it could give quick access to your smartphone.

However, you still have to keep in mind the benefits of it as well as the disadvantages of relying on smart devices too much. Finally, you can choose which smartwatch that suit you in the market and just give it a try using this device. See it yourself the benefits that you might get this smart device, Smartwatch.

Her (2013): when people rely too much on the Internet

Have you ever watched a movie titled Her (2013)? Do you know what happens with people and the computer equipped with the Internet in the movie? Through this movie, we could see how the Internet of Things could influence people life when people rely too much on the program of the Internet.

Her is an American science-fiction romantic drama film which published in 2013. This movie has written, directed, and produced by Spike Jonze. This film was based on speculative science that researched carefully for depicting the reality of the world in the future. The film is not only about the romantic drama between two entities. It is about the value that the writer wants to deliver about the possibility of the internet in the future. This is about how people are too absorb within the internet and they rely too much on it.

Her (2013) synopsis

Her 2013- when people rely too much on the Internet
When the main character of the movie feels alone, he relies too much upon the voice command technology called OS1 which is part of the Internet of Things. Photo taken from KINCIR

The story is around a lonely man named Theodore Twombly who is a professional love letter writer in the modern era in future. So desperate with her divorced with his wife, Theodore buys an Operation System (OS). This OS is equipped with voice command and Artificial Intelligence (AI) for easily adjusting and developing on its own.

Theodore chooses a female voice for the OS to fulfil his emptiness because of his divorce. The OS introduces her self as Samantha and it tries to adjust with Theodore needs and personalities. Through the film goes on, Theodore has fallen in love with Samantha. He does everything that usually most couples do in real life with Samantha.

Theodore ex-wife even thinks that he is crazy for falling in love with a computer. Even so, Theodore doesn’t care and still continues his relationship with Samantha. He also finds out that his friend Amy who divorces with her husband is dating with her OS.

Unfortunately, without any notification, Samantha disappears because the program needs to be upgraded. In this part, Theodore realizes that everyone starts to talk with their OS. When Samantha comes back again in the program, Theodore asks her about her love for him and the answer is Samantha indeed loves Theodore just like she loves her other users.

Of course, in the end, Theodore only finds himself upset because of Samantha before he knows that there a woman truly falls for him. Finally, the ends up when Theodore and Amy are finally together.

Related to the Internet

Thus, we could assume it would not be that far in the future when the internet would be we really easy to use as well as the smart device which supported the internet. From the story in the film, we could see how the human relationship is falling apart because people rely too much upon the internet even it is for simple conversation between human.

It certainly shows how the internet facilitates people life, but on the hand, it could keep people apart with others. At the end of the story, it as well depicts carefully how precious the relationship between human emotionally.

So, which part you want to choose from using this internet? Do you want to become the people that rely too much on the internet and forget the precious relationship between others, or otherwise?

Jet Pack “Iron Man” actually Flies in Real Life

Have you watched Iron Man? The technology in Iron Man’s movie series is indeed interesting. Who would think that that the imagination of that technology would exist in real life? Welcome Jet Pack “Iron Man” in Real Life!

Iron Man is a superhero made by Tony Stark and he himself is portrayed as a wealthy and intelligent man in the movie. His imagination, wealth, and intelligence create his superhero suits complete with its jet pack. Who would think that that imagination technology would complete near in the future? However, both Adam Savage and Richard Browning is able to make this technology become true. They become the true Iron Man in real-life.

What you need to know about the creators of Jet Pack “Iron Man”

Welcome Jet Pack “Iron Man” in Real Life! Photo taken from Brilio.Net

At first in 2017, Richard Browning introduced this Jet Pack to the public and he showed how his Jet Pack flies over the beach. Richard is a British inventor, entrepreneur and speaker who also the founder Gravity Industries Ltd, the company behind the creation of this Jet Pack called Daedalus. He spent three years to make this Jet Pack because he obsessed with the big Hollywood-style project like Iron Man’s Movie series.

Then he met Adam Savage, together with his team that used 3D panting technique create jet pack suit resembling Iron Man Suit. Adam Savage is an American special effect designer and fabricator. A man who is well known in the television industry as the actor, television personality, and producer. He also is a former co-host of the Discovery Channel television series MythBusters and Unchained Reaction.

The two great people have met, Richard Browning and Adam Savage, and together they bring back to life the Jet Pack “Iron Man” from the movies.

Jet Pack “Iron Man”

At first, Richard used the energy of fan and electricity before he developed the jet machine that placed at the back of the body to make the user flies. Recently, collaborating with Adam Savage they develop the Jet Pack Iron Man.

The components of the Jet Pack made from titanium materials. In addition, they told it would have the endurance from the bullet. This jet suit also uses two mini jet engines on each arm alongside a large jet attached at its user back. They created a jet with flight technology that has enough horsepower for flying above the ground. Just like Iron Man, you can control the movement by moving your hands as well.

Recently, this Jet Pack as well created a new world speed record in Guinness World Records for flying in a jet suit at 85.06mph. It beat its previous record for flying at 32.02mph in 2017.

Find out How they create Jet Pack Iron Man in real life. Photo take from YouTube

Good news! Now, you can buy thas Jet Pack “Iron Man” suit for real. You can buy it at Selfridges in London which cost you $445,000. Do you interested to be the real Iron Man?

Top 5 Online Shops in Indonesia during 2019

Do you want to buy clothes for the Christmas party? or buy some gift for your friends and family back home? You could choose from the 5 top online shops in Indonesia below, that most of the Indonesian visits buying things for their beloved ones.

According to ipriceinsights and ASEANUP below are the most popular and visited online shops in Indonesia. Nonetheless, there are only the top 5 online shops in Indonesia from so many online shops in the survey.

Before we go further, it is better to know what online shop is about. So, online shops or they would call it, e-commerce (electronic commerce) sites are the place where the activities of buying and selling products on online services or through the internet.

Hence, E-commerce or online shops could simplify the activities of shopping. You could choose from online shops below that suite you better.

Tokopedia

Top 5 Online Shops in Indonesia during 2019
Online shops in Indonesia. Photo taken from fajarpos.com

The largest and the most popular online shop that most people visit is Tokopedia. Indeed, it shows from its Monthly Traffic Estimate is around 148,500,000. It might be the result for Tokopedia to allowing individuals and business to freely open and easily manages their own stores on the platform. Tokopedia also received a lot of funds from their sponsor, from Japan’s Softbank to Sequoia Capital, The famous American tech venture capital firm.

Shopee

Meanwhile, Shopee claims to be the first online shop using a mobile marketplace app with the concept of Consumer-to-consumer (C2C). Shopee is the first online shops that provide Live Chat feature which distinguishes them from any other online shops. Later, other online shops followed their steps for this feature to enrich their own platform.

Bukalapak

Bukalapak is another top online shop in Indonesia which provide brand as well as individual to buy and sell their product online. This online shops originally made by Indonesian and they apply the concept of Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C). Furthermore, the thing you have to remember from Bukalapak is they provide extra financial guarantees for their customers.

Lazada

Lazada is an online department store and a marketplace which provides a lot of product from electronic devices, book, kid toys, medical devices, beauty product, and many more. However, Lazada Indonesia is also a branch from Internationa Lazada Group in Southeast Asia, which is a subsidiary of internet network company of Rocker Internet. Rocket Internet is an Internet company which incubate and invests in internet and technology companies globally.

Blibli

Blibli is like an online shop which resembles the mall in real life. Therefore, they provide a lot of products from gadget to computer, all kinds of fashion, from health to beauty products, stuffs for mother and children, products for home and its decoration, and even for automotive things. It also provides tickets and could give special promotion and vouchers for their users.

Top 5 Online Shops in Indonesia during 2019
Buy things in online shop using the e-wallet. Photo taken from Actualitate

You could also pay things in online shops through e-wallet that they provide to make your payment easier. Thus, that is the top 5 online shops in Indonesia! Do you already choose which site to buy things that you want?

Popular E-Wallet apps in Indonesia

In 2019, the cashless payment becomes popular in Indonesia. Then, which e-wallet apps that you want to chose for your cashless payment? Below are popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia that can be your choices.

According to iprice.co.id, their announced the list for Biggest E-Wallet Apps in Indonesia according to Monthly Active Users. Photo taken from iprice.co.id

As the result of the Internet of Things around us, it increased for people using the smartphone in Indonesia. Following those changes, the service for cashless payment using the mobile phone are increasing as well. Nowadays, using e-wallet apps for cashless payment become more popular in the society. However, too much e-wallet apps out there ends up making people confused which e-wallet to use.

Below are popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia that could become your choices for cashless payment:

Go-Pay

Go-Pay is not categorized as a finance app but Go-Pay contributed to 30% for the total transaction of e-money in Indonesia. At first, Go-pay only an e-wallet for all the payment of Go-Jek apps, from Go-Ride, Go-Car and Go-Food which is the biggest food delivery in Southeast Asia. In addition, according to DailySocial, Go-Pay would officially become one of the payment methods in Google Play.

So, it’s not a surprise anymore if Go-pay becomes the most popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia. That’s why you can choose Go-Pay for your e-wallet apps considering its facility in Go-Jek and Google Play.

OVO

Ovo placed as the second of the popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia according to the number of download app in the iprice.co.id list. You could use OVO as the offline payment in Matahari Department Store and Lippo Mall. Ovo also has collaborated with Grab Indonesia, Tokopedia and Lion Air Group as well.

The collaboration that has been done by OVO makes OVO becomes popular as a method for cashless payment. This could regain her popularity again after dropped its popularity several times before in 2019.

DANA

Dana is a newcomer as the e-wallet apps in Indonesia, but it could secure itself as the top three for the most popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia. It is an e-wallet app as the result of Ant Financial and Emtek Group partnership. Additionally, Dana is an official e-wallet for Bukalapak as its e-commerce transaction through BukaDompet.

LinkAja

LinkAja is an e-wallet for the state-owned enterprises in Indonesia. It is the result of the collaboration of T-Cash from Telkomsel, Mandiri e-cash from Bank Mandiri, UnikQu from BNI, T-money from Telkom and T-Bank from BRI. Recently, LinkAja has collaborated with Go-Pay.

Jenius

Jenius is the product of BTPN which stand for National Pensioners Savings Bank (Bank Tabungan Pensiunan Nasional). This e-wallet app becomes one of the popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia because Jenius gives a lot of advantages to its user. As examples, Jenius won’t take any fee for cash withdrawal, free administration fee, free open and closed account, free transfer fee, and free for creating Jenius’ card.

The display of Jenius as e-wallet apps on your phone. Photo taken from Kompas.com

From the popular e-wallet apps in Indonesia that have mentioned above, which one that you can use for your cashless payment method? or maybe you already used those apps above, so, which one is the from your experience for cashless payment?

Get to know what is the Internet of Things (IoT) for your daily life

The Internet of Things is what that makes your life easier! Your phone exactly is one of the many results of the Internet of Things. So, what exactly the Internet of Things (IoT) is all about? Let’s know further about it!

Maybe some of you are already familiar with these words, the Internet of Things or some others may not know about it? but really, we are living with the Internet of Things closer than we know.

Let’s see everything becomes much easier nowadays. You don’t have to go to the supermarket to buy things if you could shop online; you are now could bring less and less cash and pay things online instead; wi-fi is all around the places wherever you go. That alone could give you at least a picture about IoT.

Then, what is the Internet of Things (IoT)?

Internet of things is about the concept of the system that could transfer data through the network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction. This system itself basically is about connecting everything in the world, not only people but also things around us, from people-to-people, people-to-things, and things-to-things.

To put it simply, according to McClelland in his website, iotforall.com:

the Internet of Things means taking all the things in the world and connecting them to the internet

He also tells there are three categories from things that are being connected to the internet. First, things that could collect information and send it. Second, things that could receive information and act according to the received information. Third, things could do both of the commands before.

Moreover, the word “things” in the Internet of Things is about the subject that has equipped with IoT devices. Takes examples for a house with an anti-theft sensor, people with e-wallet for payment online, wireless speaker that you used at home or even Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) for the patient to remotely controlled from home.

IoT for our lives

The example of the Inther if things for Medical Care. Photo taken from InnovHealth twitter

Nowadays, people already rely on the Internet of Things for daily life. Just say that the way you use your phone is part of it. Even the way you reach this website is part of the Internet of Things too. The way IoT influences our lives is how our lives become much easier.

You can touch and swipe your phone to get more convenient transportation. E-wallet and barcode to pay things are also popular nowadays. You can even make your own fitness schedule with your coach online. See? All of those is thanks to the concept of the Internet of Things.

There are many predictions out there about how IoT could influence societies in the world. They even said that there will be over 10 billion connected devices in 2020. Who knows? More importantly, IoT could help human life and indeed brings a lot of benefits for our daily life. The using of IoT could lead to smart people with smart devices and this can lead to a smart society as well.

However, IoT also could push people to do things that could give harm to others. So, in the end, everything is all up to you to use it wisely and smart. At the end of the day, all choices are in your hand.

Why Google’s latest launch is more about the brand than the tech

Simone Natale, Loughborough University; Gabriele Balbi, Università della Svizzera italiana, and Paolo Bory, Università della Svizzera italiana

Google has launched its latest flagship phones, Pixel 4 and 4XL. Although the new models feature relatively marginal improvements to their predecessors, the launch was staged with much fanfare by Google, as if it represented a major breakthrough for the company and the smartphone market – despite most of the product specs being leaked before the event. The launch was just the latest in a series of product launches by leading digital tech companies that sharply overstated recent innovations.

On September 10, for instance, Apple introduced three new iPhones, revamped Apple Watches and two new subscriptions services, TV+ and Apple Arcade. Two weeks later, Amazon presented a long list of new gadgets at its Alexa event. All these launches have something in common: the “novelties” they introduce are merely iterations of their existing product offering, yet they are presented as revolutionary.

Exaggeration does not come as a surprise in marketing and advertisement. Yet digital corporations pursue a precise strategy with their product launches. The main goal of these events is not so much introducing specific gadgets. It is to position these companies at the centre of the aura that the so-called digital revolution has acquired for billions of users – and customers – around the world.

Long history

Launching new technology devices through public events predates Silicon Valley. Alexander Graham Bell and Guglielmo Marconi, two of the most popular inventors and entrepreneurs in the late 19th and early 20th century, organised events to present the telephone and wireless telegraphy.

Alexander Graham Bell launching the long-distance telephone line from New York to Chicago in 1892. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

The audience at these events were mainly scientists or technical experts, but they were also attended by politicians, entrepreneurs, and even kings and queens. The celebrated American inventor Thomas Edison went one step further, presenting his new products in public events such as international exhibitions and tech fairs.

Like today, launches of new products helped shape public opinion and to make a name for companies such as AT&T, Marconi and Edison. They were even used to fight commercial wars. At the end of the 19th century Edison launched a campaign of public events to promote his direct current standard against the rival alternating current. He even electrocuted animals (like the elephant Topsy) in front of journalists to demonstrate that the other standard was dangerous.

More recently, Steve Jobs followed the footsteps of these inventor-entrepreneurs and codified a “genre” – the so-called keynote. Alone on stage and wearing roll neck and jeans (an informal “uniform” for geeks), Jobs launched several Apple products in front of audiences of tech-enthusiasts. These events helped build the myth of Steve Jobs and Apple.

What product launches are really about

Jobs’ talent was more in the marketing and promoting of new devices than in developing technology. Since the 1980s, Apple’s founder recognised the power of a new vision surrounding digital technologies. This vision saw the personal computer and later the internet as harbingers of a new era.

It was a powerful cultural myth centred around the idea that we are experiencing a digital “revolution”, a concept traditionally associated with political change that now came to describe the impact of new technology. In this context, Jobs carefully staged his launches in order to present Apple as the embodiment of this myth.

Take, for instance, Apple’s famous 2007 iPhone launch. Jobs started his talk arguing that “every once in a while, a revolutionary product comes along that changes everything”. His examples included key moments from Apple’s corporate history: the Macintosh reinvented “the entire computer industry” in 1984, the iPod changed the “entire music industry” in 2001, and the iPhone was about to “reinvent the phone”.

This is a narrow account of technological change, to say the least. Believing that one single device brought about a digital revolution is like seeing a crowd of people in Times Square and assuming they turned up because you broadcast on WhatsApp that everyone should go there. It is, however, a convenient point of view for huge corporations such as Apple or Google. To keep their position in the digital market, these companies not only need to design sophisticated hardware and software, they also need to nurture the myth that we live in a state of incessant revolution of which they are the key engine.

In our research, we call this myth “corporational determinism” because like other forms of determinism, it poses the idea that one single agent is responsible for all changes. The way that digital media companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google communicate to the public is largely an attempt to propagandise this myth.

So you should not be worried if Google’s latest launch did blow you away. The key function of product launches is not actually to launch products. It is for companies to present themselves as the smartest agents in contemporary society, the protagonists of technological change and, ultimately, the heroes of the digital revolution.

Simone Natale, Senior Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies, Loughborough University; Gabriele Balbi, Associate Professor in Media Studies, Università della Svizzera italiana, and Paolo Bory, Lecturer in Media Studies, Università della Svizzera italiana

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Digital platforms: making the world a more complicated place

Robert Demir, Lancaster University; Christian Sandström, Chalmers University of Technology, and Christofer Laurell, Stockholm School of Economics

Digital platforms, the websites and apps which compete for our precious screen time, have successfully invaded the traditional territory of many sectors of the “old economy”. They have become the preferred – expected, even – domains for many kinds of human behaviour, from banking and property buying, to dating and entertainment.

In doing so, Airbnb, Amazon, Uber and (many) others have swiftly managed to shift economic behaviour from the world of physical bricks and mortar to a digital world powered by algorithms.

These companies are often praised for apparently providing consumers with ever more choice. But in fact, the fundamental idea behind the algorithms which power these platforms is to reduce the variation of options available.

This is because digital platforms are meticulously designed to appeal to individual users at both ends – sellers or providers, and consumers or users. In theory, this reduces the complexity of decision-making, and increases the speed of digital interaction.

Yet in many regards, digital technology has simply made things more complicated. And there are three main ways in which they have managed to do this.

First, while the boundaries between physical and digital space have become blurred, so too has the distinction between producer and consumer.

This is because social media platforms have given consumers a new and stronger voice. Likes, shares, dislikes, comments and reviews all provide information that was not available in a pre-digital age.

This voice informs both well-known brands and start-up entrepreneurs about how their products are being perceived. Consumers become part of the marketing operation in a way that was not possible before, complicating the way we value products and services.

Second, the ways in which business initiatives attract funding has also altered considerably. Specifically, crowdfunding has become a popular way of raising finance for new ideas or projects, attracting donations through collaborative contributions. And recent analysis suggests that crowdfunding is fuelling a wide array of ideas that go well beyond what would be possible in the context of traditional funding (from banks or wealthy investors).

As new business ventures gain funding and momentum more easily through the digital landscape, they increase the overall complexity of the marketplace. The speed (and scope and scale) at which markets are redefined is accelerated by entrepreneurs who create new offerings.

Third, the digital media landscape has given rise to a plethora of platforms enabled by information and communications technology for the exchange of goods and services. Specifically, the “sharing”, “access” and “community-based” economies represent new ways in which exchanges of goods and services take place on platforms such as Airbnb, Uber and Couchsurfing.

The sharing economy, however, has recently been shown to be expanding into various new sectors including fashion and sports, adding complexity by going beyond the previously dominant sectors of transportation and accommodation.

Simple? Shutterstock/BEST-BACKGROUNDS

In light of all these rapid developments, which change the conventional view of what a market-based economy is, there are several serious challenges facing society.

A simply complex situation

These concern how we all – consumers, producers, investors – manage communication, privacy and cyber security. Given the nature of the algorithmic world, voices are increasingly raised about the risks of artificial intelligence (AI) for humankind.

But before we even reach this level, the risks are great for the idea of human liberal thought, when the ways in which we are being persuaded are unclear to so many of us.

Consumers, firms and policymakers are already feeding AI-enabled online robots with ever more information aimed at improving automated digital solutions for everyday decisions, issues and concerns.

Can we balance the value generated from such digital platforms with the potential risks? Probably. But concerted action from governments and businesses is needed to enhance transparency about the risks of algorithmic solutions and decisions. That’s the only way we can all be expected to understand this brave new digital world.

Robert Demir, Lecturer in Strategic Management, Lancaster University; Christian Sandström, Associate Professor of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, and Christofer Laurell, Docent, Stockholm School of Economics

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Don’t just blame YouTube’s algorithms for ‘radicalisation’. Humans also play a part

YouTube uses a wide range of tools to keep viewers watching. Shutterstock

Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Queensland University of Technology and Joanne Gray, Queensland University of Technology

This is the second article in a series looking at the attention economy and how online content gets in front of your eyeballs. Read part 1 here.


People watch more than a billion hours of video on YouTube every day. Over the past few years, the video sharing platform has come under fire for its role in spreading and amplifying extreme views.

YouTube’s video recommendation system, in particular, has been criticised for radicalising young people and steering viewers down rabbit holes of disturbing content.

The company claims it is trying to avoid amplifying problematic content. But research from YouTube’s parent company, Google, indicates this is far from straightforward, given the commercial pressure to keep users engaged via ever more stimulating content.

But how do YouTube’s recommendation algorithms actually work? And how much are they really to blame for the problems of radicalisation?

The fetishisation of algorithms

Almost everything we see online is heavily curated. Algorithms decide what to show us in Google’s search results, Apple News, Twitter trends, Netflix recommendations, Facebook’s newsfeed, and even pre-sorted or spam-filtered emails. And that’s before you get to advertising.

More often than not, these systems decide what to show us based on their idea of what we are like. They also use information such as what our friends are doing and what content is newest, as well as built-in randomness. All this makes it hard to reverse-engineer algorithmic outcomes to see how they came about.

Algorithms take all the relevant data they have and process it to achieve a goal – often one that involves influencing users’ behaviour, such as selling us products or keeping us engaged with an app or website.

At YouTube, the “up next” feature is the one that receives most attention, but other algorithms are just as important, including search result rankings, homepage video recommendations, and trending video lists.


How YouTube recommends content

The main goal of the YouTube recommendation system is to keep us watching. And the system works: it is responsible for more than 70% of the time users spend watching videos.

When a user watches a video on YouTube, the “up next” sidebar shows videos that are related but usually longer and more popular. These videos are ranked according to the user’s history and context, and newer videos are generally preferenced.

This is where we run into trouble. If more watching time is the central objective, the recommendation algorithm will tend to favour videos that are new, engaging and provocative.

Yet algorithms are just pieces of the vast and complex sociotechnical system that is YouTube, and there is so far little empirical evidence on their role in processes of radicalisation.

In fact, recent research suggests that instead of thinking about algorithms alone, we should look at how they interact with community behaviour to determine what users see.

The importance of communities on YouTube

YouTube is a quasi-public space containing all kinds of videos: from musical clips, TV shows and films, to vernacular genres such as “how to” tutorials, parodies, and compilations. User communities that create their own videos and use the site as a social network have played an important role on YouTube since its beginning.

Today, these communities exist alongside commercial creators who use the platform to build personal brands. Some of these are far-right figures who have found in YouTube a home to push their agendas.

It is unlikely that algorithms alone are to blame for the radicalisation of a previously “moderate audience” on YouTube. Instead, research suggests these radicalised audiences existed all along.


Content creators are not passive participants in the algorithmic systems. They understand how the algorithms work and are constantly improving their tactics to get their videos recommended.

Right-wing content creators also know YouTube’s policies well. Their videos are often “borderline” content: they can be interpreted in different ways by different viewers.

YouTube’s community guidelines restrict blatantly harmful content such as hate speech and violence. But it’s much harder to police content in the grey areas between jokes and bullying, religious doctrine and hate speech, or sarcasm and a call to arms.

Moving forward: a cultural shift

There is no magical technical solution to political radicalisation. YouTube is working to minimise the spread of borderline problematic content (for example, conspiracy theories) by reducing their recommendations of videos that can potentially misinform users.

However, YouTube is a company and it’s out to make a profit. It will always prioritise its commercial interests. We should be wary of relying on technological fixes by private companies to solve society’s problems. Plus, quick responses to “fix” these issues might also introduce harms to politically edgy (activists) and minority (such as sexuality-related or LGBTQ) communities.

When we try to understand YouTube, we should take into account the different factors involved in algorithmic outcomes. This includes systematic, long-term analysis of what algorithms do, but also how they combine with YouTube’s prominent subcultures, their role in political polarisation, and their tactics for managing visibility on the platform.

Before YouTube can implement adequate measures to minimise the spread of harmful content, it must first understand what cultural norms are thriving on their site – and being amplified by their algorithms.


The authors would like to acknowledge that the ideas presented in this article are the result of ongoing collaborative research on YouTube with researchers Jean Burgess, Nicolas Suzor, Bernhard Rieder, and Oscar Coromina.

Ariadna Matamoros-Fernández, Lecturer in Digital Media at the School of Communication, Queensland University of Technology and Joanne Gray, Lecturer in Creative Industries, Queensland University of Technology

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Banning Huawei could cut off our nose to spite our face. Good 5G matters

Christopher Findlay, Australian National University

Productivity growth matters. In advanced economies over the past 15 years it has fallen by half.

Which is why it doesn’t make much sense to risk damaging one of the most important potential sources for future growth in productivity: the rollout of 5G.

5G is the next generation of wireless technology. Download speeds will be many times faster than what is possible under 4G.

And it’s not just speed. It’ll cut latency, which is the time it takes for signals to start travelling – something that will be critically important for the Internet of Things.


Forbes magazine


Nurtured well, 5G has the potential to become a “general-purpose technology”, analogous to electricity.

It holds open he possibility of creating new markets for goods and services that we can’t yet imagine.

The best suppliers of the gear required for 5G are in China, most notably Huawei, which has made the heaviest investments in the relevant technology but the problem is that Huawei caught up in security concerns.


Read more: What is a mobile network, anyway? This is 5G, boiled down


It has been banned from work on Australia’s national broadband network and from helping build Australia’s 5G networks.

In the US the president issued an executive order last May prohibiting transactions with providers subject to direction by foreign adversaries.

Britain has the matter under consideration, although there are signs it might allow Huawei in to some parts of the network.

Huawei is setting standards

Industry experts rank Huawei highly.

Hauwei’s Zhao Ming with new 5G phones in Beijing, Tuesday. Ma Peiyao/Imaginechina/AP

Its competitors are China’s ZTE, the Swedish multinational Ericsson, Korea’s Samsung and Finland’s Nokia.

There are none yet from the United States, although reports say Apple will release 5G phones next year.

But the main issues are in the 5G infrastructure where Huawei holds more of the critical patents than others. Globally, it appears to be winning the most contracts.

There is a risk that the rejection of Huawei by some will end up, in the longer term, dividing the world into zones committed to different standards, limiting interconnection.

Standard-setting bodies have expressed concern.

Different standards could constrain the development of global supply chains, pushing up prices. They could impede the scale of application and diffusion of new technologies, limiting what 5G is capable of achieving.

One estimate suggests that banning Huawei could push up costs 30%.

Huawei poses risks…

In announcing what amounted to bans on Huawei (and also China’s ZTE), the Australian government said 5G required a change in the way the networks operate compared to previous mobile technologies.

These changes will increase the potential for threats to our telecommunications networks, and these threats will increase over time as more services come online.

The government had found “no combination of technical security controls that sufficiently mitigate the risks”.

Vendors likely to be subject to extrajudicial directions from foreign governments risked failure to adequately protect 5G networks from unauthorised access or interference.

Huawei said those security concerns could be managed, as do British cyber-security chiefs.

…which can be mitigated

Europe has noted the risks and is developing a risk mitigation strategy.

Southeast Asian economies are considering degrees of engagement with Huawei.

Worth continuing attention by Australia is what former US defence secretary Robert Gates calls the “small yard, high fence” approach.

It means defining exactly where the risks lie and intervening directly to manage them, something Europe is working on.

The US appeared to be struggling after Trump’s May order. The Commerce Department was given 150 days to come up with regulations to implement it. It released a draft only last week.


Read more: US ban on Huawei likely following Trump cybersecurity crackdown – and Australia is on board


There were reports of tension in the US between those who would take the risk-based approach and others who would simply keep Huawei on the banned provider list.

Commerce has, finally, proposed a case by case approach, and has not named any particular provider. But the Federal Communications Commission has banned Huawei from access to its universal services subsidies.

International cooperation could give us room to solve the problem. It could include cooperation with China. China and Australia share concerns about cybersecurity and could together in the same way as we do over other standards to facilitate trade.

Attempting to completely eliminate risk could lumber us with big costs. Some would be financial, others might come from stunting the next technological revolution.

Christopher Findlay, Honorary Professor of Economics, Australian National University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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